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During the day, your schedule is often jam-packed with various activities that you pursue to get ahead in life. It can leave you exhausted at the end of the day and you long for the comfort of your bed as you drift off the sleep and rest your tired and aching mind and body. Sleep deprivation actually puts you at higher risk of various medical conditions, so make sure you get that well-deserved snooze when everything has been said and done during the day.

Normally, our body clock tells us to wake up when the sun is up and to sleep when the moon has taken the place of the sun up in the sky. However, modern living has significantly messed up your circadian rhythm and you end up tossing and turning until the wee hours of the morning. Modern technology is mainly to blame like cable TV and smartphones. As a result, you sport that dark under eye circles that aren’t just ugly to look and the unceasing feeling of exhaustion and irritability common among most night owls.

The University of Bonn in Germany conducted a study that demonstrates that one bad’s night sleep will mean your heart needs to work 10% harder the next day.

Why? This is because a one night of disturbed sleep ups your heart rate and blood pressure and causes your body to release cortisol (the same hormone produced when you’re stressed, too.)

The man behind the study, Dr Daniel Kuetting, was quoted by The Telegraph saying: ‘For the first time, we have shown that short-term sleep deprivation in the context of 24-hour shifts can lead to a significant increase in cardiac contractility, blood pressure and heart rate.’
‘The study was designed to investigate real-life work-related sleep deprivation. As people continue to work longer hours or work at more than one job to make ends meet, it is critical to investigate the detrimental effects of too much work and not enough sleep.’

(Via: http://www.marieclaire.co.uk/life/bad-sleep-health-effects-510734)

Doctors say that your health improves when you sleep better and vice-versa. While the exact ideal sleeping hours vary from person to person, experts suggest sleeping for at least eight hours each night allows your body to rest and recharge for what lies ahead the following day.

Sleep has been a hot topic over the past few years, and with good reason: According to the National Institute of Health, more than one-third of adults don’t get the recommended 7 to 8 hours of sleep per night, and evidence shows that even children and adolescents sleep less than needed. Most people already know that not getting enough sleep has all types of horrible side effects like puffy eyes, memory loss, and overall grogginess, but what if sleep deprivation is also the reason you reach for a slice of pizza instead of a kale salad?

While it’s been previously thought that the body craves unhealthy snacks for a quick burst of energy to stay awake and alert when your body is tired, new research presented at the Cognitive Neuroscience Society’s annual meeting in San Francisco shows that sleep deprivation actually increases the brain’s sensitivity to food smells. A preliminary study conducted by Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago explains that participants who slept only four hours showed greater brain activity in response to food smells, like potato chips and doughnuts, compared to when they’d slept a full eight hours.

(Via: http://www.rd.com/health/healthy-eating/lack-of-sleep-and-food-cravings/)

Your physical and mental health improves with enough sleep daily. Sleep helps your brain work better and aid in the formation of new pathways, so learning and retaining information becomes natural to you. No wonder you feel alert and refreshed after a good night’s sleep but feel drowsy and inattentive when you constantly pull all-nighters. Snoring, meanwhile, can also be a pain. Something like the VitalSleep can help (https://snoring.mouthpiece.report/vitalsleep).

Many of your body’s organs and systems also function efficiently with enough sleep. You are less likely to feel a dip in energy throughout the day and will often be more productive too. Hence, it is important for drivers or people operating machinery to get enough sleep or risk getting hurt or injured in the process. It’s easy to see how your health improves when you sleep better and the other way around. Sleeping is nature’s way of telling you to pull all your cares aside for now and let your body rest for a while to ready itself for next day’s battle.

Good Health Equals Better Sleep.. was first published to The Snoring Mouthpiece Report

From https://snoring.mouthpiece.report/vitalsleep/good-health-equals-better-sleep

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